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Social design for social media companies August 15, 2007

Posted by jeremyliew in communication, Consumer internet, Internet, social media, social networks, user generated content, web 2.0.
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At the end of June, Motorola published the results of an ethnographic study that they did on the sharing (communication) practices of family and friends. They collected in depth data for 2-3 weeks on 5 different social groups. The powerpoint is well worth reading as a reinforcement of the principles of social product design. The key findings will apply to anyone building social media and communications products:

Motorola Findings

As one of the study’s authors says on the Motorola blog:

When we talk about the “user experience” the main emphasis is often on an individual’s experience with a particular technology. Even with a purported social technology, for example a social networking site, we still tend to create for the individual’s interaction with the site (how does someone find their friend, how do they access this site easily from a mobile device).

However, designing for sociability means thinking about how people experience each other through the technological medium, not just thinking about how they experience the technology. The emphasis is on the human-to-human relationship, not the human-to-technology relationship. This is a crucial difference in design focus. It means designing for an experience between people.

Read the whole thing , but one example that really struck home to me was about “focusing on the (meta) message” rather than “focusing on the mechanics of communication”. If you understand the meta message being sent as part of communications, you can really improve your users experience. Motorola gives two “meta messages” that are common “I know you” and “I care about you”. Facebook‘s birthday notifications on their homepage is a great example of a product feature that supports both of these meta messages. It helps users know when to write on a friend’s wall (or Superwall!) to send both these messages, both to the recipient, and as a performance for other friends of the recipient.

For those interested in more about social design, I also find Josh Porter’s blog Bokardo quite helpful.

Comments»

1. Paul Sweeney - August 16, 2007

Great lead. Thanks for posting it.

2. Ted Rheingold - August 19, 2007

I’d say this is an instant Must Read for anyone doing anything where customers/users have a collective experience.

Thx!


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