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Virtual Goods and Real Money Trade: Paving the paths March 13, 2008

Posted by jeremyliew in business models, digital goods, facebook, friendster, games, games 2.0, gaming, myspace, social networks, virtual goods.
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As I read the coverage about the real money trade in MMOs panel at GDC, I was reminded of danah boyd’s thoughts on why MySpace took off and Friendster did not, which notes in part:

Friendster killed off anyone who didn’t conform to their standards, most notably Fakesters and those with more creative non-photorealistic profiles. When MySpace users didn’t conform, they were supported and recognized for their contributions to evolving the system.

A good analogy to both situations is what to do when faced with a nice green lawn on a college campus. Some students will always cut across the grass, leaving worn paths. There are three solutions to this problem:

(i) Erect a fence around the lawn and put up some “keep off the grass” signs. This keeps the grass green and pristine, exactly as the landscape architect imagined it, but forces unhappy students to go the long way around to their classes.

(ii) Do nothing, let students cut across the grass and tramp mud into classrooms.

(iii) Pave the paths. Students take the shortest paths, no mud in classrooms, and the rest of the lawn stays green.

Friendster put up “keep off the grass” signs. Myspace paved the paths.

Now if you ask students as to what should be done about the muddy paths, they’ll probably suggest option number one. But its those same students that created the paths in the first place! It is more important to watch what users do than what they say. Facebook is facing a similar dilemma with its apps right now.

Games companies have the same issue with virtual goods. The abundance of real money trading markets for virtual goods tell us what users want to do (despite their vociferous claims to the contrary). If game developers don’t pave these paths, they risk muddy classrooms or unhappy students.

Comments»

1. dogstercatster - March 13, 2008

Related food for thought.

My wife told me at Purdue when the University constructs new buildings they do not immediately landscape the surrounding area. They wait at least six months to see the path the students take before spending the money to put in the sidewalks in and landscaping the rest.

I think this translates very well. Let your users show you want they want to do and then make it as easy as possible for them to do that. Fight them in any way and you’ll be fighting them forever.

2. Jeremy Luebke - March 13, 2008

Good observations. I see the same things with email marketing. Everyone says they hate receiving ads in their email but then we send out emails and low and behold, people open them, click on the ads, and buy over and over.


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